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GSM Special Notices

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GSM Special Notices

GSM Fall Banquet and Lecture Monday, September 17, 2012, 5:30 PM

GSM Fall Banquet and Lecture
Monday, September 17, 2012, 5:30 PM


Location: Grand City Buffet,  8912 Highway 7, St Louis Park, MN 55426 
(952) 912-0888   Detailed directions at the end of this e-mail.


Pay for buffet as you enter.


Come to the lecture at 7:00 PM even if you do not plan to eat.  

Status of Minnesota Geological Survey Investigations
             by
Harvey Thorleifson, Ph.D., Director of the
Minnesota Geological Survey (MGS)

Abstract: 
Although much information on geological observations, measurements, and inferences is held by the private sector, public
geological survey agencies have been charged with maintaining systematic, regional, and jurisdiction-wide information that is meant to clarify the
context of site investigations, and to support the progress of research and regional planning.  This information includes reports and maps that convey
interpretations, as well as geophysical, geochemical, and geological databases that provide observations and measurements, as well as needed
collections of tangible materials such as rock samples and thin sections. In coordination with the federal role of the U.S. Geological Survey, and
international geological survey initiatives, current emphasis at the Minnesota Geological Survey is on systematic enhancement of digital
information on the statewide scale, while also focusing on county-scale needs.  Particular emphasis has been placed on accelerated production of
multi-layered, 1:100,000 County Geologic Atlases, complete with associated databases, that are needed for regional management of ground-water
resources. In addition, statewide geological mapping compilations are being developed at scales of 1:100,000 and 1:500,000, implementing current digital
methods that allow content to be zoomed, queried, and viewed in 3D. While publication sales, the web site, and ftp are being maintained, current
intentions are to shift information products to Open Geospatial Consortium-compliant web services. This will allow users either to gain
access to MGS products though the conventional MGS web site, or to gain direct access to the data through their preferred GIS platform or web
interface.
Professional Biography:
Harvey Thorleifson is Director of the Minnesota Geological Survey, State Geologist of Minnesota, Professor in the Department of Geology and
Geophysics at the University of Minnesota, and President, Association of American State Geologists. He did his undergrad at University of Winnipeg,
his Masters in geology at University of Manitoba in 1983, and his Ph.D. in geology at University of Colorado in 1989. He was with the Geological Survey
of Canada from 1986 until 2003, prior to joining the Minnesota Geological Survey.

Harvey Thorleifson Ph.D., P.Geo., D.Sc., Director, Minnesota Geological Survey; State Geologist of Minnesota;
President, Association of American State Geologists; Professor, Department of Earth Sciences; University of Minnesota;
Telephone  612-627-4780 ext 224; Fax 612-627-4778; thorleif@umn.edu
Minnesota Geological Survey
2642 University Avenue
St. Paul, MN 55114-1057
Grand City Buffet in St. Louis Park.
Here are directions to Grand City Buffet in St. Louis Park, at 9812 Highway 7. It is located in a small strip mall near the Knollwood Plaza shopping Mall.  The small strip mall is called the Knollwood Village.
     West on 394 until you get to 169,
     South on 169, past Highway 5, then very quickly comes up to W 36th Street
     Exit on W 36th Street (right hand lane), top of ramp, turn Left
     First stop light is Boone Ave., turn right and you are at Knollwood Village
     Pull into parking lot, Grand City Buffet is at far end, near Target.
We start eating around 5:30, with the talk scheduled to start about 7:00 to 7:15 PM
Come at anytime after 5:00 PM, and feel free to come for the lecture even if you do not wish to have the buffet.

Grand City Buffet is located in Knollwood Village, not Knollwood Mall.
Grand City Buffet is just north of Target. 
Westbound on MN-7 Turn RIGHT onto AQUILA AVE S.
              AQUILA AVE S is 0.2 miles past TEXAS AVE S
0.10 mi  Turn LEFT onto BOONE AVE S/W 37TH ST.
               If you reach W 36TH ST you've gone about 0.1 miles too far
0.3 mi. 8912 HIGHWAY 7.

        If you reach W 36TH ST you've gone about 0.1 miles too far

Eastbound on MN-7
Cross over US HWY 169
0.8 mi   Turn LEFT onto AQUILA AVE S.
•                If you reach TEXAS AVE S you've gone about 0.2 miles too far

0.1 mi   Turn LEFT onto BOONE AVE S/W 37TH ST.
•                If you reach W 36TH ST you've gone about 0.1 miles too far

0.3 mi   8912 HIGHWAY 7.
•                If you reach W 36TH ST you've gone about 0.1 miles too far

South bound on US Highway 169
If you are coming on west or east bound I-394, exit to south US 169
      South on US 169, past Highway 5, get in the right lane, and take the exit
      for W 36th Street.
      Exit at W 36th Street (right hand lane), go to top of ramp, turn left onto W 36TH ST
      First stop light is BOONE AVE S., turn right and you are at Knollwood Village
      Pull into parking lot, Grand City Buffet is at far end.


Please note, there is NO ramp for W. 36th Street from Northbound 169, so use
the following if you are north bound on US Hwy 169:
North bound on US Highway 169 N

      Merge onto MN-7 E.

0.8 mi   Turn LEFT onto AQUILA AVE S.
•                If you reach TEXAS AVE S you've gone about 0.2 miles too far

0.1 mi   Turn LEFT onto BOONE AVE S/W 37TH ST.
•                If you reach W 36TH ST you've gone about 0.1 miles too far

0.3 mi   8912 HIGHWAY 7.
•                If you reach W 36TH ST you've gone about 0.1 miles too far



 

GSM Lecture: Monday, October 1, 2012, 7:30 PM

GSM Lecture: Monday, October 1, 2012, 7:30 PM


Location: University of MN, Kenneth Keller Hall, 200 Union St SE, Room 3-210
Keller Hall also called the Computer Science-Electrical Engineering Building.
It is near the corner of Washington Ave. and Union Street, with parking across
Union Street.  Washington avenue is now closed to traffic, so see the following
detailed directions at the end of this e-mail.


Plate Tectonics:
When a well known theory is not so well known.
         by
Scott Clark, Ph.D., Assistant Professor,
University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire


Abstract


How well do geoscience novices and experts understand Earth processes that are related to fundamental aspects of plate tectonics? In this seminar, I will address this question by presenting an analysis of data I obtained via questionnaires, interviews, and an eye-tracking study.  As might be expected, geoscience novices hold a number of alternative conceptions (AKA misconceptions) after their first college-level exposure to plate tectonics. Confusion is common on topics such as the fate of subducting plates, causes of melting, state of matter of the mantle, and how transform boundaries work.  What might be surprising is how far into the expert realm many of these alternative conceptions can be retained.  Along with the findings of this study, I will present evidence that points to how some of these alternative concepts are supported by our teaching, and why they are retained well beyond the undergraduate level.

Short Biography:


I am an Assistant Professor of Geology at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire. My B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees are from The Universities of Kansas, Iowa, and Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, respectively.  My Ph.D. research was in the field of stable isotope geochemistry.  While at The University of Illinois, I held a one-year NSF GK-12 Fellowship working with 5th-graders in southern IL.  It amazed me to see those students learning basic geoscience concepts as easily as many college-level students.  That experience piqued my interest in how people learn about Earth and Earth processes, and led me to post-doctoral research in Julie Libarkin's Geocognition lab at Michigan State University.  Geocognition is a relatively new field that applies cognitive science methodologies to investigations of how people perceive and interpret the Earth and Earth phenomena.  Beyond being interested in students' alternative conceptions about Earth and Earth processes, and the persistence of those conceptions across the expert-novice continuum, I am actively studying how scientific concepts are communicated by instructors and the news media.

Directions:


Washington Ave. is now permanently closed in front of Kellar Hall, the old Computer Science building that we have been meeting in for the past 10 years.  This complicates the driving.  If you have used Washington Ave. to cross the Mississippi River, you will not be able to do that anymore. To get into the parking ramp across Union Street from Kellar Hall, will take a bit of time and patience. 


If you travel I-94, exit at Huron Ave, which is on the east side of the Mississippi River.  The first stop light after the exit is SE Fulton.  Turn left on Fulton to Harvard Street.  Note that Fulton merges with East River Parkway just before it reaches Harvard, and technically, Fulton ends at the merger.  Do not follow East River Parkway past the University Hospitals, instead turn right on Harvard.


Harvard is a narrow, busy street, so go slow and keep alert for pedestrians and cyclists, who seem to ignore cars.    Cross Washington Ave. and the parking ramp we all know and love is just on the other side.  Turn left on Beacon Street, and left again on Union. 
It's a bit difficult getting there from I-94, but from every other direction it's not that bad.  The easiest is via 35W to University Avenue.  Then east to Church Street.  Turn right (south) on Church at the Bell Museum.  Go 1 block, then turn left on Union (between the Armory and the Architecture Bldg.).  Follow Union around to the west side of the parking ramp.


For folks who must use I-94, another possibility is to exit at 280 and then get on University Avenue.  For the next month or so, the intersection at Univ. will still be a mess.  Take Univ. west as far as Williams arena, then  branch onto 4th St. as it becomes one way.  Go a few blocks to 17th Avenue.  Turn left.  In 1 block you cross Univ. and then 17th becomes Church St.   Then follow the directions in the paragraph just above.

 

GSM Lecture: Monday, October 24, 2011, 7:30 PM

 

GSM Lecture: Monday, October 24, 2011, 7:30 PM

Location: University of MN, Kenneth Keller Hall, 200 Union St SE, Room 3-210

Keller Hall was called the Computer Science-Electrical Engineering Building.
It is near the corner of Washington Ave. and Union Street, with parking across
Union Street.  Washington avenue is now closed to traffic, so see the following
 detailed directions at the end of this e-mail.

Humans as a Geological Transport Mechanism:

Tracing the Movement of Lithic Resources across the Ancient Near Eastern Landscape 

         by

Ellery Frahm, Ph.D., University of Minnesota

“Humans as a Geological Transport Mechanism: Tracing the Movement of Lithic Resources across the Ancient Near Eastern Landscape”

Abstract: 
Stone tools continued to be used -- and transported long distances by people -- in the ancient Near East well beyond the introduction of metal but have received little archaeological attention.  It is widely thought that studying stone tools can offer little new information during a period in which there is a variety of artifacts and texts available to study.  Obsidian -- that is, natural volcanic glass -- is unparalleled in its widespread distribution by humans throughout the region and in its ability to be sourced back to its geological origins, so it provides unique information about contact, exchange, and migration.  Before the recent excavations at Tell Mozan (the Bronze-Age city of Urkesh) in northeastern Syria, most of the information about its inhabitants, the ancient Hurrians, was inferred from linguistic or textual evidence.  Using sophisticated geological techniques to Identify the volcanic sources of their obsidian artifacts, though, can shed light on a number of highly debated issues.  The study of humans as the newest geological transport mechanism -- only occurring during the last two million years or so -- offers a unique archaeological perspective.

Bio:
Ellery Frahm earned a PhD in Anthropology at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, where he is currently a Research Associate in the Department of Earth Sciences and a Lecturer in the Department of Anthropology.  His research interests involve the intersections of the geosciences and archaeology, in particular using geological techniques as a means to study archaeological materials and answer questions about human behavior.  He is especially interested in natural resource access, exchange, and utilization in antiquity.  His regional focus is Southwest Asia, what is now Syria, Turkey, and the Caucasus.  For his dissertation, he studied the obsidian tools at a Bronze-Age archaeological site in northeastern Syria, and his current research involves Paleolithic obsidian use by Neanderthals in Armenia, where he conducted fieldwork this summer.  He is currently Vice President and President Elect of the International Association for Obsidian Studies.


Directions:

Washington Ave. is now permanently closed in front of Kellar Hall, the old Computer Science building that we have been meeting in for the past 10 years.  This complicates the driving.  If you have used Washington Ave. to cross the Mississippi River, you will not be able to do that anymore. To get into the parking ramp across Union Street from Kellar Hall, will take a bit of time and patience.  

If you travel I-94, exit at Huron Ave, which is on the east side of the Mississippi River.  The first stop light after the exit is SE Fulton.  Turn left on Fulton to Harvard Street.  Note that Fulton merges with East River Parkway just before it reaches Harvard, and technically, Fulton ends at the merger.  Do not follow East River Parkway past the University Hospitals, instead turn right on Harvard.

Harvard is a narrow, busy street, so go slow and keep alert for pedestrians and cyclists, who seem to ignore cars.    Cross Washington Ave. and the parking ramp we all know and love is just on the other side.  Turn left on Beacon Street, and left again on Union.  

It's a bit difficult getting there from I-94, but from every other direction it's not that bad.  The easiest is via 35W to University Avenue.  Then east to Church Street.  Turn right (south) on Church at the Bell Museum.  Go 1 block, then turn left on Union (between the Armory and the Architecture Bldg.).  Follow Union around to the west side of the parking ramp.

For folks who must use I-94, another possibility is to exit at 280 and then get on University Avenue.  For the next month or so, the intersection at Univ. will still be a mess.  Take Univ. west as far as Williams arena, then  branch onto 4th St. as it becomes one way.  Go a few blocks to 17th Avenue.  Turn left.  In 1 block you cross Univ. and then 17th becomes Church St.   Then follow the directions in the paragraph just above.

 

GSM Lecture: Monday, January 24, 2011, 7:30 PM

GSM LectureMonday, January 24, 2011, 7:30 PM

Note minor room change:

Room 3-230: This is the room right next to the room we have had for years at the University of Minnesota, East bank campus, Electrical Engineering/Computer Science Bldg, now called Keller Hall, 200 Union St SE, Mpls, 55455

 

Probing the Interior of the Earth:

A Geophysical Journey

  by

Dr Ian Williams

University of Wisconsin, River Falls

 

Probing the Interior of the Earth: A Geophysical Journey

The investigation of the Earth’s interior is a classic example of the scientific method.  Since this region is so remote – more remote than the surfaces of the other planets – we have been forced to use geophysical techniques, primarily those based on the interpretation of earthquake records. These seismic records have enabled us to construct a model of the interior that has lead us to an understanding of the structure and composition of the interior.  The records have  become the basis for seismic tomography: which allows us to see the convection taking place in the mantle.  Although relatively crude, tomography has revealed aspects of the core that have helped us understand the origin of the earth’s magnetic field.

 

Professional Bio -Dr. Ian Williams, University of Wisconsin River Falls.

Ian Williams has been on the faculty of the University of Wisconsin River Falls since 1982.  He holds a PhD, with research on geomagnetic reversals, from the University of California, Santa Barbara. He also has a Masters in geophysics from the University of Newcastle upon Tyne (UK) and a B.Sc. in geology from Durham University (UK).  He teaches classes in geophysics, structural geology and planetary geology and is currently involved in an on-line class in sustainable energy. Working with undergraduates has given him the opportunity to indulge in numerous research projects ranging from the gravity studies of the St. Croix Valley to impact cratering, fold and fault simulation and weathering of the St. Peter Sandstone.  In addition he has traveled widely with UWRF’s international programs in Europe and developed an interest in the structure of the Pyrenees.

GSM Fall Banquet and Lecture

 

GSM Annual Meeting and Lecture

September 20, 2010

 

Grand City Buffet,   (952) 912-0888    8912 Highway 7
St Louis Park, MN 55426   44.9348 -93.3926

      Pay for meal as you enter

            Start feasting any time after 5 PM

            Lecture starts between 7 and 7:30 PM

            Come for lecture even if you do not wish to eat

 

Des Moines Lobe Tills in Minnesota

  by

  Barbara A. Lusardi,  Geologist, Minnesota Geological Survey

 

The till of the late glacial, southern Laurentide Des Moines lobe covers much of south-central Minnesota and extends into central Iowa.  It is loam-textured with nearly equal amounts of sand, silt, and clay with rock fragments derived from the northwest, including crystalline, carbonate, and shale clasts.  The general provenance was recognized early (Winchell and Upham, 1888) and the presence of the Cretaceous Pierre shale was part of the definition of the New Ulm Till (Matsch, 1971 and 1972).  Mapping and analysis of deposits of the Des Moines lobe reveal several texturally and lithologically distinct tills within what had been considered to be homogeneous glacigenic sediment.  Although the differences between tills are subtle, minor distinctions are predictable and mappable, and till sheets within the area covered by the lobe can be correlated for over 1000 km parallel to ice-flow. The ice streams flowed from northwestern Saskatchewan, across southwestern Manitoba and northeastern North Dakota into Minnesota. We suggest that: 1) lithologically distinct till sheets correspond to unique ice-stream source areas; 2) the sequence of tills deposited by the Des Moines lobe was the result of the varying dominance over time of nearby and competing ice streams in the Buffalo Corridor (Ross et al., 2009; O’Cofaigh et al., 2010); and 3) in at least one instance, more than one ice stream simultaneously contributed to the lobe.  By studying tills associated with the Des Moines lobe, we can understand the changing dynamics in its source ice shed during deglaciation.

         References:

Matsch, C.L. 1971: Pleistocene stratigraphy of the New Ulm region, southwestern Minnesota: Madison, University of Wisconsin, Ph.D. Dissertation, 78 p.

Matsch, C.L. 1972: Quaternary geology of southwestern Minnesota,. In Sims, P.K. & Morey, G.B. (eds.): The geology of Minnesota: A centennial volume: Minnesota Geological Survey, p. 548-560.

O’Cofaigh, C., Evans, David J.A. & Smith, I.R. 2010, Large-scale reorganization and sedimentation of terrestrial ice streams during late Wisconsinan Laurentide ice sheet deglaciation, GSA Bulletin, v. 122, no. 5/6, p. 743-756.

Ross, M., Campbell, J.E., Parent, M. & Adams, R.S. 2009: Palaeo-ice streams and the subglacial landscape mosaic of the North American mid-continental prairies. Boreas, 10.1111.

Winchell, N.H. & Upham, W. 1888: The geology of Minnesota. Vol. 2 of the final report, 1882-1885: Geological and Natural History Survey of Minnesota, 695 p.

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